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[EDIT: and by "Lucien", I mean the bespectacled librarian of Neil Gaiman's Sandman series, not the SCA persona of the same name. Answer as many or as few of these as you'd like.]

I'm curious, friends. :)

What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island?

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography?

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days.

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?

What was your favorite book when you were 10?

me(me)

Date: 2008-02-14 07:34 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] katasutra.livejournal.com
What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island? this is a terrible question. Hm. I'm going to assume that blank notebooks are in endless supply on this desert island, so I'm not including one of those. :) An enormous dictionary. A fat thesaurus. Then poss. Bird by Bird & a Jeanette Winterson. (for now).

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography? Viscosity.

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days. "We do not accept [the] premise, that detailed reporting and artful writing are incompatible, which is flawed and, in many respects, elitist. We believe that art and literature not only document change but can also inspire and facilitate it." From the introduction to Creative Nonfiction:33 - Silence Kills: Speaking Out and Saving Lives.

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be? My sister's automythography.

What was your favorite book when you were 10? Must've been Tiger Eyes

Date: 2008-02-14 07:46 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] cat9.livejournal.com
What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island?
The Golden Bough (Experience has shown that I will build a house, cook a feast, tame wild horses, generally do anything rather than settle down for a long read of this book. Might be useful.)
An Oblique Approach (Pure candy, but great beach reading. And what else is a desert island?)
Busman's Honeymoon (For culture.)
And an Idiot's Guide to learning a language I don't know, just to keep my brain in gear.

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography?
In these shoes?

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days.
"The feeling of being surrounded by a few million parasites is a hard one to put into words. If you put your face close to a jar filled with a graceful ribbon, a tapeworm pulled from a porcupine, you can't help admire its hundreds of segments, each with its own set of male and female sexual organs, all brimming with life and caught like a photograph in these preserving spirits. Then, just for a second, you begin to worry that the whole creature will twitch a little, suddenly flail, and then break out of the glass." (Parasite Rex)

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?
I'd like one more Dorothy L. Sayers novel. Just one more. And I promise I would read it over and over again.

What was your favorite book when you were 10?
I think it was probably Through the Looking Glass. I still love that :)

Date: 2008-02-14 07:53 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] dancingwolfgrrl.livejournal.com
My desert island book list has long included a collected Shakespeare, Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and Phantom Tollbooth. Obviously, passing up a fourth book would be sheer folly, but not many things stand up to re-reading in my world. Maybe Ulysses? I could become a famous scholar of it on my return! Or maybe Homer, as I could at least memorize it to keep from expiring of boredom?

I joke that my t-shirt should say "your mileage may vary," but I am too young to answer any autobiography questions :)

I am at work without my books, so no quotes.

For sheer impact on the world, how about "The Ten Commandments: The Three Thousandth Anniversary Edition?" :)

Date: 2008-02-14 07:59 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] learnedax.livejournal.com
So You Want to Build a Sailboat, 50 Ways to Escape a Desert Island... Ahem.

Lord of Light, Lord of the Rings, In Search of Lost Time, Ulysses. The OED and Encyclopedia Britannica are tempting cop-out options.

Afterburn

No good quotations spring to mind...

William Marshal's guide to strategy.

Probably something by Daniel Pinkwater, but possibly The Caves of Steel...

Date: 2008-02-14 08:10 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] herooftheage.livejournal.com
So You Want to Build a Sailboat, 50 Ways to Escape a Desert Island... Ahem.


Great minds sink to the same gutters, and apparently, ours do too.


Date: 2008-02-14 08:07 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] herooftheage.livejournal.com
4 Books:

Silverlock, by John Myers Myers
Shogun, by James Clavell
The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress, by Robert Heinlein

and because 4 books won't be enough:

How To Build A Wooden Boat, by David Macintosh

Autobiography: A Journey Through Space-Time.

Interesting few lines:

The royal Abbey of St. Denis had been famous enough in earlier times, but the part it played in western civilization was due to the efforts of one extraordinary individual, the Abbot Suger. He was one of the first men of the Middle Ages whom one can think of in modern, I might almost say in transatlantic, terms. His origins were completely obscure and he was extremely small, but his vitality was overwhelming. It extended to everything he undertook - organization, building, statesmanship. He was Regent of France for seven years and a great patriot; indeed he seems to have been the first to pronounce those now familiar words: "The English are destined by moral and natural law to be subjected to the French, and not contrariwise." He loved to talk about himself without any false modesty, and he tells the story of how his builders assured him that beams of the length he needed for a certain roof could never be found because trees were just not as tall as that. Whereupon he took his carpenters into the forest ("they smiled" he says, "and would have laughed if they dared"), and in the course of the day he had discovered twelve trees of the necessary size, had them felled, and brought back.

from Civilization, by Kenneth Clark (the TV show is better, but the book reminds me of it, after all these years. I really should see if there are DVDs around.)

Own what book? Hmm, it would have to be one not written, since I pretty much own the books that I really crave. I think I'd like to find out how Gordy Dickson's Childe Cycle ends. Not very earthshattering, but there you have it.

Favorite book when I was ten: this is a tossup - The Black Stallion, by Walter Farley, and Half Magic, by Edward Eager.


Date: 2008-02-14 10:36 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] marysdress.livejournal.com
4 Books
How long will I be there and do I get to bring a huge supply of paper and pens?

:-)

Date: 2008-02-14 10:56 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] gyzki.livejournal.com
What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island?
Presuming that Euell Gibons and David Macintosh are ruled out...
Would I be allowed to count A la recherche du temps perdu as one book? If not, then just ...chez Swann
Gibbon's Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
Eddison's The Worm Ouroboros
...and you know, I really might like to find out How to Build a Wooden Boat

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography?
torn between Slowly I Learned, Step by Step and Vaster than Empires, and More Slow

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days.
"By threatening the liberty of the French people to choose their government for themselves, the monarchies gave them a popular, deeply emotional cause such as the territorial and dynastic wars could never have generated. With the old French Army of the Bourbon monarchy disintegrating, and French finances even more chaotically in peril than they had ever been under the ancien régime, the Revolution nevertheless proved able to defend itself against such ambitious aims. It could do so by calling upon the people whose grievances and aspirations it embodied. It could enlist the might of the nation in arms." - Russell F. Weigley, The Age of Battles.

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?
The Gospel of James the Brother of Jesus.

What was your favorite book when you were 10?
I know for certain what my favorite *three* were; deciding which of those was my most favorite is a little arbitrary. I think The Sword in the Stone, by T.H. White.

Date: 2008-02-15 03:02 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] calygrey.livejournal.com
Four books: Anna Karenina, Beowulf, SAS Survival Handbook (the rest of you will starve before you get that boat built - me, I'll have dinner waiting), and the Bible (it's really long, really involved, and I haven't read it yet).


Autobiography title: "Verisimilitude"


Quote: "Non-citizens where hung; citizens were beheaded."

"Magdalena and Balthasar : "An Intimate Portrait of Life in 16th Century Europe Revealed in the Letters of a Nuremberg Husband and Wife", Ozmet.


Book not yet written: "Folk Wisdom and Folk Tales of the European Ice Age Lowlands"


Favorite book as a ten year old: hoo, that's tough. I absolutely do not remember. So, the first book I remember really liking a lot would have been "The Odyssey" (I skipped the boring bits.)

Date: 2008-02-15 03:05 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] calygrey.livejournal.com
(I read the Odyssey when I was eleven; I had a favored Greek Mythology book when I was ten.)

Date: 2008-02-15 03:11 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] herooftheage.livejournal.com
(the rest of you will starve before you get that boat built - me, I'll have dinner waiting)

I wouldn't make book on that - I'm pretty sure you could still drop me in the woods with little more than my wits, and I'd find food and make shelter before all that long.

Date: 2008-02-15 03:18 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] calygrey.livejournal.com
I suppose that should be as good as throwing a gauntlet; except I'm too lazy. You were a boyscout; I taught boyscouts. I know how to do it without a book too.

Date: 2008-02-15 05:16 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] a-c-fiorucci.livejournal.com
What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island?

An older copy of a Boy Scout Handbook (preferably a big one with some food/camping info); Gaudy Night or Busman's Honeymoon; The Hero and the Crown; maybe LotR, as I've not read it in a while.

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography?
Toss up between: My Give A Damn's Busted (with Bonus! soundtrack) or The Balance of Opposing Forces

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days.
There's a great one in the C.J.Cherryh book of short stories but I left it at work. So I give you this: "It follows that the one thing we should not do to the men and women of past time, and particularly if they ghost through to us as larger than life, is to take them out of their historical contexts. To do so is to run the risk of turning them into monsters, whom we can then denounce for our own (frequently political) motives -- an insidious game, because we are condemning in their make-up that which is likely to belong to a whole social world, the world that helped to fashion them and that is deviously reflected or distorted in them. Censure of this sort is the work of petty moralists and propagandists, not historians."Fire in the City: Savonarola and the Struggle for the Soul of Renaissance Florence by Lauro Martines.

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?
The diary of Countess Matilda of Tuscany

What was your favorite book when you were 10?
Little Women would be my best guess.

Date: 2008-02-15 12:04 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] ladysprite.livejournal.com
Ooh, interesting questions!

Four books - 'Watership Down,' 'Gone With the Wind,' 'Memory and Dream,' by Charles DeLint, and.... a bible. Not because I'm particularly religious, but because that's probably the only situation where I'd ever sit down and read the darn thing, and I've been told it's interesting from a literary standpoint.

'Death and Other Harmful Side Effects.'

"To this day there he sleeps, Colonel Tom, frostily coiled beneath my ice cube trays and chocolate Dove bars. Every time I think about burying the poor bastard I get depressed." - Carl Hiaasen, 'Basket Case.'

Any collaboration between Louisa May Alcott and Henry Thoureau.

Hmm - I'd have to say it was a toss-up between 'Eight Cousins' by Louisa May Alcott, and 'Dragon's Blood' by Jane Yolen.

Hmmn

Date: 2008-02-15 06:27 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] cristovau.livejournal.com
I'll take a cheat like the others, but mine is to include This as one of my books. I suspect I could use the binding as shelter and the pages for useful kindling.

More seriously, The Best of James Herriot kept me sane when I was abroad. I imagine I have read the tales in The Ultimate Hitchhiker's Guide: Five Complete Novels and One Story more times than any other story. It is gloriously entertaining mental popcorn. The Riverside Shakespeare is a must, if for "The Tempest" alone. FInally, I would probably put a boyhood classics on the list, maybe, Dragonriders of Pern. Interestingly enough, three of my four selections have a character who gets stranded somewhere.

My autobiography? Full of Smiles and Giggles, Signifying Nothing

Quote? "An unusual feature of Conestoga wagons was that they were built with their brakes and "lazy boards" - a kind of extendible running-board - on the left-hand side. If there was a particular reason for putting them there, it has since been forgotten. With drivers compelled to sit on the left, they tended to drive on the right so that they were positioned near the centre of the road, which is why, it appears, Americans abandoned the British custom of driving on the left."

Fictional Book? Fine Foolish Folio For Fooling by William Kemp

My favorite book at 10 was The Lord of the Rings. No lie. I finished it in 4th grade. I didn't understand all of it, but I had read and loved it.

Date: 2008-02-24 05:08 am (UTC)
From: [identity profile] pamelina.livejournal.com
If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?

Shakespeare's Autobiography--a book I really, really, want.



Date: 2008-02-25 09:41 pm (UTC)
From: [identity profile] rising-moon.livejournal.com
For my own records, since things change:

What 4 books (if you only got four) would you bring with you to a desert island?
SAS Survival Manual (because I'm my father's daughter)
Riverside Shakespeare
Webster's Unabridged Dictionary
The (single-volume) Columbia Encyclopedia

What would be the title of your (as yet fictional) autobiography?
Love, Dorothy (from the snarky T-shirt quote, "Dear Auntie Em: Hate you, hate Kansas, taking the dog. Love, Dorothy.")

Quote a memorable passage (a few lines) of a book you're reading these days.
"She walked her favorite route, along what had once been a corridor between ship's cabins and was now an ivy-smothered canyon. The walls were studded with passion flowers, broken windows just visible beneath a mesh of roots. Where the old cabin-hills sank into the grassy surface and the pathway opened out into the sun, there was a fringe of honeysuckle purring with bees."
- from The Scar, by China Mieville

If you could own any book, written by anyone at any time, even if it hasn't been written yet or was never written, what would it be?
Aristotle's Comedies

What was your favorite book when you were 10?
My Side of the Mountain, by Jean Craighead George